sleppid grindini

For hundreds of years, the people of the Faroe Islands hunt Pilot Whales in a tradition called Grindadráp. In these hunts, the cetaceans are driven to a bay or fjord where many people await for them. In shallow waters, the hunters in the beach use a hook to bring the animals closer and severe their spinal cords with a spear. After this, their head is cut open to bleed the whales, leaving a sea of blood behind.

The meat and blubber are shared among the hunters and the villages where the killing happened, and can't be sold, but it's easy to find them on Faroese supermarkets and restaurants, even though these products are not fit for human consumption because of their high levels of mercury, PCB and DDT derivatives. Nowadays, the people of the Faroe Island has one of the highest living standards in Europe, and there's no need to hunt a species that is listed as Data Deficient in the IUNC Red List of Threatened Species and could be endangered.

So Sea Shepherd Global, a NGO dedicated to protect marine wildlife worldwide, sailed to Faroese waters to oppose and phisically interfer with the hunts in order to stop them. Using non violent strategies, Sea Shepherd volunteers managed to save thousands of lives patrolling the archipelago and driving dolphins and whales away from the deadly shores. Doing so, the organization had dozens of volunteers arrested and 7 small boats seized by Danish authorities, but this was considered a small inconvinience compared to what the animals they saved would suffer if Sea Shepherd wasn't there for them.

 
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